Evaluation of a Farmers’ Market Intervention on Food Insecurity, Health, and Diet of Individuals Living in Rural, Appalachian Mississippi

Poole, Heather A. (2017) Evaluation of a Farmers’ Market Intervention on Food Insecurity, Health, and Diet of Individuals Living in Rural, Appalachian Mississippi. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of David H. Holben from Nutrition and Hospitality Management, The University of Mississippi.

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Abstract

Objective: This study examined: 1) the impact of a farmers’ market nutrition education and incentive intervention on household adult food security status, produce intake, perceived diet quality, and perceived health of individuals living in rural, Appalachian Mississippi; and 2) the relationship of household adult food security status to produce intake, perceived diet quality, and perceived health at baseline. Methods: Participants were recruited for a 12-week farmers’ market nutrition education and incentive ($3.00/week) intervention at two rural farmers’ markets in an economically distressed, Appalachian Mississippi county and completed pre- and post-intervention surveys. Results: The mean age of participants (n=60) was 57 years (SD=13 years). Participants were predominately white (n=51, 85%), female (n=51, 85%), married (n=36, 60%), with some college or higher education (n=40, 66.7%), and food secure (n=47/56, 83.9%). Sixty-five percent of participants (n=39) completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys. The intervention did not significantly impact household adult food security status (scale score) [pre, MEAN=0.590 (SD=1.545); post, MEAN=0.492 (SD=1.470)] (p=.344), vegetable intake [pre, MEAN=2.3 servings (SD=0.9 servings); post, MEAN=2.5 servings (SD=1.0 servings)] (p=.242), and fruit intake [pre, MEAN=1.6 servings (SD=0.9 servings); post, MEAN=1.7 servings (SD=0.9 servings)] (p=.244), total produce intake [pre, MEAN=3.9 servings (SD=1.4 servings); post, MEAN=4.2 servings (SD=1.5 servings)] (p=.071), perceived diet quality (p=.135), and perceived health (p=.285). At baseline, food insecurity was significantly related to only perceived diet quality (taub=-0.250, p=.039). Conclusion: A farmers’ market nutrition education and incentive intervention was not effective in improving household adult food security status, produce intake, perceived diet quality, and perceived health of individuals living in rural, Appalachian Mississippi. However, household adult food insecurity status was associated with poorer perceived diet quality of participating adults.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Poole, Heather A.
Student's Degree Program(s): B.S. Nutrition and Dietetics
Thesis Advisor: David H. Holben
Thesis Advisor's Department: Nutrition and Hospitality Management
Institution: The University of Mississippi
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Depositing User: Heather Poole
Date Deposited: 12 May 2017 14:42
Last Modified: 12 May 2017 14:42
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/883

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