Modeling Migraine Chronification and its Relief; the Effects of THC on Recurrent NTG-Induced Migraine Endpoints in Rats

Sowers, Blake (2017) Modeling Migraine Chronification and its Relief; the Effects of THC on Recurrent NTG-Induced Migraine Endpoints in Rats. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of Kenneth Sufka from Psychology, University of Mississippi.

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Abstract

This study investigated the analgesic effects of a THC pro-drug in a rodent model of recurrent migraine. Rats received 4 nitroglycerin-induced (NTG: 10mg/kg/2ml) migraine episodes every third day for 12 days; saline, cremaphor-vehicle, propranolol (10mg/kg/ml), or THC-VAL-HS (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg/ml) were given IP 30 minutes before NTG. Behavioral endpoints of photosensitivity, activity, orbital tightening, and tactile allodynia were assessed 110 m after NTG. Migraine severity increased over the course of the four episodes, pointing toward chronification and an important step in model validation. However, neither propranolol nor THC-VAL-HS significantly attenuated any of the migraine-related endpoints. These data are in contrast with clinical reports that marijuana mitigates migraine severity. These findings suggest that higher doses of THC-VAL-HS and/or other cannabinoid constituents in marijuana may be responsible for such anecdotal anti-migraine activity of cannabis.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Sowers, Blake
Student's Degree Program(s): B.A. Biochemistry
Thesis Advisor: Kenneth Sufka
Thesis Advisor's Department: Psychology
Institution: University of Mississippi
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Depositing User: Blake A Sowers
Date Deposited: 11 May 2017 19:57
Last Modified: 11 May 2017 19:57
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/847

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