Multidimensional Motion Capture Using Doppler Ultrasound

Gamble, Forrest Nolan (2016) Multidimensional Motion Capture Using Doppler Ultrasound. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of James Sabatier from Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi.

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Abstract

Ultrasonic waves are used to measure the velocity of a target object by measuring the Doppler shift of the reflected waves. In this work, ultrasonic Doppler Sonar (UDS) was used to measure the velocity of objects, including a pendulum and a battery on a turntable. The investigation focused on developing a method to measure motion in two and three dimensions, for applications in gait analysis and sports motion capture. By using multiple ultrasonic transducers and novel data processing techniques, the UDS captured motion in two and three dimensions. In order to test the accuracy of the velocity and position measurements, the UDS was compared to Dartfish, a video motion capture system. Ultrasonic Doppler successfully captured the motion of a pendulum in one dimension and a battery on a turntable in two and three dimensions, but some limitations arose depending on the target object’s shape, material, and velocity. The UDS and Dartfish measured the maximum velocity of a pendulum theoretically found to be 0.62 m/s as 0.60 m/s and 0.60 m/s respectively. To test 2D motion capture, the displacement of a battery traveling on a rotating turntable was measured. The orthogonal diameters were measured to be 12.4 cm (UDS) and 12.5 cm (Dartfish) for the x-direction and 12.4 cm (UDS) and 12.6 cm (Dartfish) for the y-direction.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Gamble, Forrest Nolan
Student's Degree Program(s): B.S. Physics
Thesis Advisor: James Sabatier
Thesis Advisor's Department: Physics and Astronomy
Institution: University of Mississippi
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Depositing User: Mr. Forrest Gamble
Date Deposited: 13 May 2016 13:47
Last Modified: 13 May 2016 13:47
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/569

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