An Examination of the Theory of Alternate Routes to High School Graduation and its Implication on Mississippi’s Educational System

Hardges, Kimberly L. (2015) An Examination of the Theory of Alternate Routes to High School Graduation and its Implication on Mississippi’s Educational System. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of Jonathan Winburn from Political Science, University of Mississippi.

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Abstract

During Mississippi’s 2014 Regular Legislative Session, Representative John L. Moore, Chair of the Education Committee, introduced House Bill 767 (HB 767). The goal of HB 767 was to create a pilot program that would “remove the requirement for passage of Subject Area Tests as a mandatory requirement for graduation... and to establish the minimum composite score to be attained on the ACT assessment to qualify a student for graduation and for college and career readiness”1 in the state of Mississippi. By a vote of 118-1 HB 767 passed the House. The bill was then transmitted to the Mississippi State Senate where it died in the Education Committee. The senators then amended a senate bill to include a provision that would enact the ACT pilot program. The senate bill failed to receive enough votes to be passed. I believe that the state of Mississippi will continue to try to implement the ACT as an alternate route to high school graduation, so this thesis will attempt to answer the following questions: 1. What effects would HB 767 have on Mississippi’s educational system? 2. Is the ACT a good alternate route to graduation? 3. How should the state handle alternate routes?

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Hardges, Kimberly L.
Student's Degree Program(s): B. A. in Political Science
Thesis Advisor: Jonathan Winburn
Thesis Advisor's Department: Political Science
Institution: University of Mississippi
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Depositing User: Kimberly L. Hardges
Date Deposited: 12 May 2015 18:36
Last Modified: 12 May 2015 18:36
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/455

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