Carbon Dioxide Capture by Functionalized Graphene Oxide Adsorbent

Aloba, Sulihat Oreoluwa (2015) Carbon Dioxide Capture by Functionalized Graphene Oxide Adsorbent. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of Wei-Yin Chen from Chemical Engineering, The University of Mississippi.

[img]
Preview
Text
Thesis.pdf - Submitted Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

The accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere is a major environmental hazard. As a result various methods for capturing CO2 was suggested. One of such methods included the development of carbon-based adsorbents due to their large surface area and low heat capacity for CO2 capture which was studied in this report. Graphene oxide (GO) was selected as the adsorbent for its potential benefit in CO2 capture. A modified hummers method was used for the synthesis of GO which showed the existence of the hydroxyl (3440 cm-1), epoxyl (1036 cm-1) and carboxyl (1720 cm-1) functional groups in its FTIR spectra. The C/O ratio in the GO was on an average of 2.57. The hydroxyl groups were subjected to a Johnson-Claisen rearrangement which gave rise to an ester functional group attached to GO. The ester group was saponified to carboxylic acid groups and reacted with ethylenediamine to produce an amine-functionalized GO. The amine which increases the CO2/H2 selectivity for pre-combustion CO2 capture got attached to the carboxylic and epoxyl groups in GO. Thermogravimetric analysis was done on the amine-functionalized GO and a weight gain of about 1.173% which signified the adsorption of CO2 was achieved. However, improvements to this procedures need to be taken since a considerable amount of CO2 was not captured in future work.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Aloba, Sulihat Oreoluwa
Student's Degree Program(s): Chemical Engineering
Thesis Advisor: Wei-Yin Chen
Thesis Advisor's Department: Chemical Engineering
Institution: The University of Mississippi
Subjects: T Technology > TP Chemical technology
Depositing User: Sulihat O Aloba
Date Deposited: 06 May 2015 19:22
Last Modified: 06 May 2015 19:22
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/323

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item