Method Development for the Detection and Quantitation of Illicit Drugs in Fingerprints Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

Roussel, Madison (2015) Method Development for the Detection and Quantitation of Illicit Drugs in Fingerprints Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of Murrell Godfrey from Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Mississippi.

[img] Text
FINAL THESIS.pdf
Restricted to Registered users only until 1 September 2015.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (8MB) | Request a copy

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to develop a method for the detection and quantitation of caffeine and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinol in fingerprints using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The matrix used was 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB). The presence of the analytes was confirmed by analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinol was chosen as the drug of interest because it is the major metabolite of tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component of marijuana. Marijuana’s popularity as a recreational drug continues to increase with its legalization and decriminalization across the country. It is critical to establish methods for the quantification of the drug in humans for the purpose of determining levels of intoxication, similar to measuring blood alcohol levels. This research shows that MALDI-MS is not capable of quantification at this time, only qualitation within the limits of detection of the instrument. Further studies will explore better methods to improve quantification and new matrices to improve the limit of detection.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Roussel, Madison
Student's Degree Program(s): B.S in Forensic Chemistry
Thesis Advisor: Murrell Godfrey
Thesis Advisor's Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Institution: The University of Mississippi
Subjects: >
Depositing User: Madison Roussel
Date Deposited: 06 May 2015 18:56
Last Modified: 06 May 2015 18:56
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/301

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item