Code-Switching Practices in the Foreign-Language Classroom: Instructor Nativeness and Students' Perceptions

Gill, Zachary Ty (2019) Code-Switching Practices in the Foreign-Language Classroom: Instructor Nativeness and Students' Perceptions. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of Maria Fionda from Modern Languages, The University of Mississippi.

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Abstract

In this study we investigated code-switching practices in the foreign language classroom among instructors who are native speakers of the target language (Spanish) and instructors who are non-native speakers of the target language, as well as students’ perceptions of L1 use. Participants were three college instructors of Spanish and 38 college students in an intermediate level Spanish course. The participants were observed and recorded during two hour-long classes involving group work. After the observations, the instructors completed an interview, and the students completed an online questionnaire. This study found that native instructors use less English than non-native instructors and the native English-speaking Spanish instructor used the most amount of English. Students’ perceptions of English use in the classroom align with the amount of English used in the classroom. Students with the native instructor found English use less advantageous while students with the non-native instructors found English more advantageous. The findings in this study suggest that students’ perceptions may be influenced by the amount of English to which they are exposed.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: Gill, Zachary Ty
Student's Degree Program(s): BA in Linguistics, Spanish, and Classics
Thesis Advisor: Maria Fionda
Thesis Advisor's Department: Modern Languages
Institution: The University of Mississippi
Subjects: P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
P Language and Literature > PC Romance languages
Depositing User: Zachary Ty Gill
Date Deposited: 10 May 2019 19:14
Last Modified: 10 May 2019 19:14
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/1491

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