Cardiolipin Profiling in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

McNeely, Meghan Houston (2018) Cardiolipin Profiling in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells. Undergraduate thesis, under the direction of Dagle G Nagle from Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Mississippi.

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Abstract

Six human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, LM, BoM, T47D, MCF7, and MCF7-BoM) were treated with three differentially targeted phospholipase inhibitors (bromoenol lactone, tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate, and halopemide) as well as various dietary oils (canola oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, olive oil, sesame oil, and soybean oil). Cell viability assays were performed to examine the effects of each inhibitor and oil in varying concentrations on the proliferation of each breast cancer cell line. The goal was to detect changes in cardiolipin concentration within each cell line after exposure to a series of various phospholipase inhibitors and oils. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on a cardiolipin standard as well as lipid extract samples from each cell line in order to detect changes in cardiolipin composition before and after the addition of test compounds. Because the MS results for the cell lines did not display a peak for the cardiolipin standard, we could not use these results as a valid means for determining the changes in cardiolipin composition between the samples. However, BEL, halopemide, D609, canola oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, and olive oil did prove to cause a statistically significant difference in the cell viability of various breast cancer cell lines.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Creators: McNeely, Meghan Houston
Student's Degree Program(s): B.S. Biology
Thesis Advisor: Dagle G Nagle
Thesis Advisor's Department: Biomolecular Sciences
Institution: The University of Mississippi
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Depositing User: Ms. Meghan McNeely
Date Deposited: 09 May 2018 18:58
Last Modified: 09 May 2018 18:58
URI: http://thesis.honors.olemiss.edu/id/eprint/1104

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